Abstract

Sequence Stratigraphy, Depositional Systems and Ground-Water Supply

Author(s): Dockery III, D.

Ground-water supplies in the state’s Tertiary, Late Cretaceous, and even Paleozoic aquifers are not all evenly distributed. Many (and some of the most prolific) are concentrated in valley-fill deposits created during times of low sea level and in the channels of fluvial and deltaic systems that formed during sea-level lowstands and sea-level highstand-regressive intervals. Examples of such linear and lenticular water-supply sands include: (1) valley-fill sands in the Tuscaloosa Formation, (2) valley-fill sands in the basal Clayton Formation, (3) valley-fill sands in the Coal Bluff Member of the Naheola Formation (lower Wilcox aquifer), (4) valley fill sands in the Gravel Creek Sand Member of the Nanafalia Formation (lower Wilcox aquifer), (5) valley-fill sands in the basal Tuscahoma Formation (middle Wilcox aquifer), (6) highstand-regressive channel sands in the lower Hatchetigbee Formation (upper Wilcox aquifer), (7) valley-fill sands in the Meridian Sand (upper Wilcox aquifer), (8) highstand-regressive channel sands in the Kosciusko Formation (Sparta Aquifer), (9) highstand-regressive channel sands in the Cockfield Formation, (10) valley-fill sands in the Forest Hill Formation, (10) valley-fill sands in the Waynesboro Sand, (11) valley fill sands in the basal Catahoula Formation, (12) valley-fill sands in the Citronelle Formation and other high-level terrace deposits, and (13) valley-fill sands in the Mississippi River Alluvium (Alluvial aquifer).

There are two major drainage systems responsible for most of the valley-fill and fluvial/deltaic-channel deposits, which serve as aquifers for ground-water supplies in Mississippi. The first is an ancient drainage basin with an Appalachian source, which is often referred to as the ancestral Tennessee River. This ancient river system is responsible for valley-fill gravels and sands of the Tuscaloosa Formation in northeastern Mississippi and for the vein-quartz and heavy minerals in the state’s Tertiary and Quaternary gravels and sands. The second drainage basin drained a portion of the North American mid-continent and is referred to as the ancestral Mississippi River. This river system has been credited for fluvial sands as old as the Late Jurassic sandstones in the Smackover Formation in west-central Mississippi. It is certainly responsible for those Late Cretaceous and Tertiary formations that thicken along the axis of the Mississippi Embayment as well as the Pliocene gravels of the Citronelle Formation in west-central Mississippi and the perched Early Pleistocene pre-loess gravel deposits below the loess along the eastern Mississippi River valley wall, extending from Tennessee to Louisiana.







 

Technical Presentations

  • Delta Water Quality
  • Delta Water and Agriculture
  • Wetlands
  • Water Quality
  • Sediments
  • Non-Point
  • Management and Sustainability
  • Wood Treatment
  • Modeling
  • Soil and Water Treatment

Workshops

Responsible Site Design: Implementing Innovative Stormwater Management Strategies

The primary goal of the workshop is to create a dynamic learning experience that examines the role of stormwater management in the built environment. The workshop will focus on integrating ecologically sound water management approaches into site design. After the workshop, attendees will be familiar with the following concepts and technical issues:

  • Knowledge of the stormwater treatment chain
  • Knowledge of the impact of land use codes on stormwater management
  • Application of a design process that mitigates the effects of stormwater on-site
  • Knowledge of the relationship between land use codes and design for innovative stormwater management

Information

For information contact:
Jessie Schmidt
MWRRI
Box 9680
Mississippi State, MS 39762
662-325-3295
jschmidt@cfr.msstate.edu